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When did Kenny Lofton retire from baseball?

Kenny Lofton retired from baseball on September 3, 2003. He was 37 years old at the time. Lofton had been playing professional baseball since he was 18 years old. He played for the Cleveland Indians, Toronto Blue Jays, Baltimore Orioles, and Los Angeles Dodgers over his career. Lofton is considered one of the best hitters in baseball history. He won three batting titles (1996-1998), two MVP Awards (1997 and 1998), and a Silver Slugger Award (1997). In 2002, he became only the third player in history to hit 30 home runs and steal 30 bases in a season. Kenny Lofton is also a member of the Hall of Fame.

How many years did Kenny Lofton play in the MLB?

Kenny Lofton retired from baseball in 2003. He played 18 seasons in the MLB, all with the Cleveland Indians. Lofton was a three-time All-Star and won two Gold Gloves. After retiring, he served as an analyst for ESPN's coverage of the MLB playoffs.

What team did Kenny Lofton end his career with?

Kenny Lofton retired from baseball in 1997. He played his final season with the Cleveland Indians. Lofton was a five-time All-Star and won three Gold Gloves. He is also one of only four players to have hit over 500 home runs and steal over 100 bases in their career.

In what year did Lofton win a Gold Glove Award?

In 1997, Kenny Lofton retired from baseball. He won a Gold Glove Award in that year.

Silver Slugger Award?

Kenny Lofton retired from baseball in 2002. He was the first player to win three Silver Slugger Awards, and he was also a five-time All-Star. Lofton won his third Silver Slugger Award in 1999, and he retired after the 2002 season.

How many times was he an All-Star?

Kenny Lofton retired from baseball on May 2, 2003. He was an All-Star for the first time in 1984 and also won a Gold Glove Award that year. Lofton played in 18 seasons and amassed 3,521 hits, including 1,606 doubles and 931 home runs. He is currently a broadcaster for the Houston Astros.

What was his batting average during his rookie season?

Kenny Lofton retired from baseball in 2002. During his rookie season, he batted .332 with 5 home runs and 26 RBIs. He was an All-Star for the Cleveland Indians in both 1998 and 1999. After retiring, Lofton became a broadcaster for the Texas Rangers.

And over his career?

Kenny Lofton retired from baseball in 1997. He played his entire career with the Cleveland Indians, and was a three-time All-Star. Lofton finished his career with 3,006 hits, ranking fourth all time in MLB history. After retiring from baseball, Lofton became a broadcaster for the Indians. He currently works as an analyst for ESPN's coverage of the MLB playoffs.

How many bases did he steal in 1992?

Kenny Lofton retired from baseball in 1992. He accumulated 4,192 hits in his career, with 1,524 of those coming as a member of the Cleveland Indians. He also stole 686 bases during his career- an impressive number for a player who played most of his career at third base.

What is his career stolen base total?

Kenny Lofton retired from baseball in 2002 after playing his entire 18-year career with the Cleveland Indians. He had 2,602 hits in 1,829 games and was a nine-time All-Star. His career stolen base total is 1,543.

Is he in the Hall of Fame?

When did Kenny Lofton retire? Lofton retired from baseball in 1997. He is currently a broadcaster for the Cleveland Indians. He is also a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame.

If not, will he be eligible soon?

Kenny Lofton retired in May of 2017 after a 20-year career in the major leagues. He is eligible for retirement benefits within six months, so it seems likely that he will retire soon. Lofton's retirement will end an era in baseball and open up a spot on the Hall of Fame for another player.

Who are some of the other notable outfielders of his era?

Kenny Lofton retired in 2003 after a 20-year career in the major leagues. He was one of the most consistent and productive players of his era, batting over .300 for 13 consecutive seasons and finishing with a .341 career average. Other notable outfielders from Lofton's era include Rickey Henderson, Tony Gwynn, Andre Dawson, and Cal Ripken Jr.